Morris, the Military Dog, Can’t Survive Without Community Support

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Photo courtesy of Paws of War
Photo courtesy of Paws of War

According to the U.S. Department of Defense, there are around 1,600 dogs in the nation’s military. They play a crucial role in helping to keep the country safe. Along the way, they bond with the military personnel they serve with. Morris is a retired military working dog (MWD) in desperate need of financial support from the community. The support to cover Morris’s medical expenses is a matter of survival and something that the U.S. Navy Sailor who adopted him desperately needs, so he turned to Paws of War for help.

“Morris helped protect our troops, so the least we can do is to help him in his retirement,” says Robert Misseri, co-founder of Paws of War. “It will be too costly for Sailor Daniel who is still serving in the Navy, so we will help him with that burden.”

Morris had been stationed in the Middle East, along with Sailor Daniel. He put in 12-hour shifts, in 100 plus degree heat, along with our troops, helping to keep them safer. He spent a career as a military dog that helped with explosive detection. He was forced to retire when he suffered from a spinal injury. This is when Sailor Daniel decided to adopt him. While he knew the economic burden of adopting him with the spinal injury, he was willing to do what it took to help him. The two were bonded, and he couldn’t imagine leaving him, especially in his vulnerable position due to the injury.

With emergency veterinary visits due to needing immediate surgery to remove a mass in his abdomen and the costs of caring for Morris are more than a military member can bear. Paws of War has stepped in to help alleviate the economic burden of providing veterinary care. The medical expenses are significant, but considering the deep relationship between the two and Morris’s work protecting the troops for years, there’s no way not to come together and ensure he is well taken care of for the rest of his life.

“Morris and I have an incredible bond, and I appreciate the work he has done in the U.S. Navy, and the way he helped me during deployment,” says Sailor Daniel. “I’m so grateful that Paws of War is willing to help with the significant medical expenses, ensuring that Morris will get the care that he needs and that they can stay together.”

Through the Paws of War’s MWD Mission Well Done Program, Morris will get the care he needs and live his life with his sailor. The mission can only succeed with the community’s help coming together to ensure the financial support is there. To contribute to the cause, visit the site at: https://pawsofwar.org/?form=Morris

To see a video of Sailor Daniel and Morris while previously overseas, visit the site at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdcKofGvz48


Paws of War also has a War-Torn Pups and Cats program that has helped many soldiers get their adopted cats and dogs to America. Still, it can only do so with the compassionate support of members of the public, who are the driving force behind all the organization can do. When people in the community donate to help support these missions, Paws of War can continue to make reunions happen.

Paws of War has been operating worldwide since 2014, helping the military save the animals they rescue while deployed overseas. They have helped veterans with numerous issues, including suicide prevention, service and support dogs, companion cats and dogs, food insecurity, veterinary care, etc.Paws of War has a large loyal following of supporters and looks forward to working with new corporate sponsors to support these life-saving programs. To donate to support their mission, visit its site at http://pawsofwar.org.

 

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